Bahia vs. Floratam

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Argentine Bahia has thin, wide, light green blades. Coarse texture.

St. Augustine Floratam has thick, wide blades. Coarse texture. Darker (bluish) green than Bahia.

Argentine Bahia is more of a forage grass. In fact, if left unmowed, will quickly produce a lot of tough seed boxes. Otherwise, does not require much maintenance.

Floratam looks like a lush, thick carpet. Healthy St. Augustine turf will even choke out weeds.

It grows aggressively and propagates via purplish stolons (above ground runners).

 

FULL SUN is a must. Will thin out in shade.

Likes FULL SUN (least shade tolerant of other St. Augustine varieties).

Does well in cold weather, but goes dormant (turns brown) and will not be green again until warm weather is established.

Prefers warm weather; will survive a freeze.

Bahiagrass likes water, though it is considered to be drought tolerant. It will go dormant (brown) due to dry weather conditions and lack of irrigation, however, will green up quickly if watering is reestablished.

Most drought tolerant of other St. Augustine varieties (may even develop thick thatch if over watered)

Likes to be mowed every 5-7 days during growing season. Preferred Bahia mowing height: 3"-4"

Likes to be mowed. Recommended Floratam mowing height is 2"-3"

Fertilize in spring (16-4-8) and fall.

Fertilizing schedule: spring and fall. Iron supplement in summer is recommended.

Grows quickly.

Grows quickly.

Argentine Bahia back yard
(click photo to enlarge). Offered at Gladiator Sod as pallets and pieces (see prices). Seeds are available, but check store for availability.

 

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St. Augustine Floratam landscape
(click photo to enlarge). Offered at Gladiator Sod as pallets and pieces (see prices).

Check store for availability

Check store for availability